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Corybas diemenicus Veined Helmet-orchid
Photo P Spencer
Flowers June to October


Pterostylis curta Blunt Greenhood
Photo E Collins
The dark, twisted labellum helps to identify this greenhood. Often found under Cherry Ballart.


Orthoceras strictum Horned Orchid
Photo E Collins
Flowers Nov-Dec and confined to Pilot section of the park.


Caleana major Large Duck-orchid
Photo E Collins
Flowering September to November


Diuris punctata Purple Diuris
Photo E Collins
Oct-Nov. In damp areas.This beautiful orchid is a highly threatened species


Diuris punctata Purple Diuris
Photo E Collins
A spectacular species of wetter habitats.


Dipodium hamiltonianum Yellow Hyacinth-orchid
Photo E Collins
This spectacular orchid is a leafless parasite and an endangered species.


Calochilus robertsonii Beard Orchid
v


Thelymitra nuda Plain Sun Orchid
Photo E Collins
Oct-Jan


Prasophyllum validum Sc J jpeg
Photo by Scott Jessup


Pterostylis revoluta Autumn Greenhood
Photo E Collins
This orchid can occur in large groups.Flowering April/May


Caladenia cucullata Hooded Caladenia
Photo E Collins


Pterostylis striata Striated Greenhood
Photo E Collins
Flowers June-July.Flowering plant lacks the basal rosette.Uncommon in Chiltern.


Pterostylis curta Blunt Greenhood
Photo E Collins
Occasionally occurs in a double-headed form. Flowers July to December


Thelymitra rubra Salmon Sun-orchid
Photo E Collins


Cyrtostylis reniformis Small Gnat-orchid
Photo N Blair
An often overlooked species as it blends so well with the ground litter Aug-Sept


Pheladenia deformis.
Photo E Collins
One common name is Bluebeard Orchid.
Uncommon in Chiltern. Flowers in September


Pterostylis sp aff parviflora Inland Red-tip Greenhood
Photo E Collins
This autumn flowering greenhood lives up to its name and is so easily overlooked. It lacks a basal rosette Photo April


Acianthus collinus Inland Pixie-caps
Photo E Collins
Uncommon.


Paracaleana minor Small Duck-orchid
Photo E Collins
Rare in the park. Flowers from October to December.


Thelymitra antennifera Rabbit Ears
Photo E Collins
A delicate yellow Sun-orchid. Flowers in Chiltern in October. The column has distinctive brown lobes which give it the common name of Rabbit Ears.


Prasophyllum validum 2 sc J
Photo by Scott Jessup


Pterostylis cycnocephala Swan Greenhood
Photo E Collins
Uncommon. Flowers August to October.


Calochilus robertsonii Purple Beard-orchid
Photo E Collins
Flowers September-January.
Occasionally the beard is silvery green.


Chiloglottis trapeziformis Dainty Wasp-orchid
Photo N Blair
Distinguish by its trapeziform shaped labellum with prominent dark calli resembling a bunch of grapes. Aug-Sept.


Cyrtostylis reniformis Small Gnat-orchid
Photo N Blair
Showing the flower detail


Glossodia major Waxlip Orchid
Photo E Collins
The white waxy part of the labellum gives this lovely orchid its common name.


Pterostylis plumosa Woodland Bearded Greenhood
Photo E Collins
Sept-Nov An elegant and unusual orchid. Uncommon.


Caladenia moschata Scented Caladenia
Photo E Collins
Formerly known as the Musky Caladenia, information per Gary Backhuse


Cyrtostylis reniformis leaf Small Gnat-orchid
Photo Neil Blair
Nice leaf detail. The underside is green.


Pterostylis pedunculata Maroonhood August
Photo E Collins
An easily overlooked species. Occasionally occurs in green form.


Diuris pardina Leopard Orchid
Photo E Collins
Flowering from July. Very variable in colour. Common


Prasophyllum validum 3 Sc J
Photo by Scott Jessup


Orthoceras strictum Horned Orchid
Photo E Collins
Confined to the Mt Pilot section of the park. Uncommon green form


Eriochilus cucullatus Parson’s Bands
Photo E Collins
A delicate autumn flowering orchid.Growing amongst the leaf litter it is easily overlooked. Photo date April 17th


Pterostylis striata Striated Greenhood
Photo E Collins
Flowering time June-July.
Uncommon in Chiltern.


Acianthus exsertus Large Mosquito-orchid
Photo E Collins
Flowers March to July. Uncommon


Pterostylis nutans Nodding Greenhood
Photo E Collins
May-Dec. Can form large colonies often under the shade of Cherry Ballart in Chiltern.


Pterostylis smaragdyna Emerald Greenhood
Photo E Collins
A tall winter flowering greenhood. June and July


Caladenia carnea Pink Fingers White form
Photo E Collins


Corybas incurvus Slaty Helmet Orchid
Photo E Collins
Jun-Sept in shaded sites


Physcia sp Rosette Lichen
Photo N Blair.
Showing the thick grey rims of the apothecia or fruiting bodies.


Cladonia sp
Photo N Blair
This is a shrubby species of Cladonia.
Sp unknown.


Dawsonia longiseta Small Dawsonia
Photo Neil Blair.
The capsule is hidden in this protective hair-cap, which has white and pinkish hairs.


Punctelia sp Speckleback lichen
Photo Dr G Ambrose
This lichen is recognised by the whitish pores on the upper surface.


Breutelia affinis Common breutelia
Photo N Blair
A nice close-up of the leaves


Ochrolechia sp Saucer or Crab’s-eye Lichen
Photo Dr G Ambrose
The surrounding orange lichen is Sunburst Lichen in its dry form.


Cladia aggregata Glossy Shrub-lichen
Photo N Blair
Showing the fruiting bodies.


Broad-lobed Marchantia. M berteroana
Photo E Collins
The “umbrellas” are immature and there are no gemma cups.This photo was taken post fire and The Fire Moss and Lichens were among the first colonizers of the bare ground.


Grimmia laevigata Salt and Pepper Moss
Photo N Blair
The distinctive features are the ribbed capsules which stand out above the foliage.


Asterella sp
Photo E Collins
The dainty dark-stalked umbrella-like structures are the female reproductive organs that contain the eggs. August. Common in damp areas.


Cladonia sp
Photo N Blair


Asterella and Chiloscyphus Liverworts and Crestwort
Photo N Blair
An interesting collection of liverworts and mosses.The green umbrellas are the mature female organs and the small brown ones are immature female organs.


Triquetrella papillata Weissia controversa and Grimmia pulvinata
Photo G Ambrose
Mosses in their dry state.


Lichen Unknown species
Photo N Blair
Possibly a Parmelina sp


Heterodea muelleri Common Ground-frill Lichen
Photo N Blair
Here the brown furry parts, or Rhizines, may be clearly seen.


Breutelia affinis Common Breutelia
Photo N Blair
This photo shows the distinctive, flower-like male plant. August.


Punctelia Flavoparmelia and Parmotrema Lichens
Photo Graeme Ambrose
Punctelia is the
blueish-green lichen,Flavoparmelia is yellowish and Parmotrema is the grey ruffled one.


Parmotrema sp Ruffle Lichen
Photo N Blair
On old fruit tree at Bartley’s Block.


Dawsonia longiseta Small Dawsonia
Photo N Blair
Close-up of the leaves.


Dawsonia longiseta Small Dawsonia
Photo N Blair A series of photos showing the attributes of this species.
An attractive moss, especially when the capsules are fresh.Common


Triquetrella papillata Weissia controversa and Grimmia pulvinata
Photo G Ambrose
A collection of mosses on a rock. T papillata has slender pointy leaves, W controversa has broader leaves and G pulvinata has leaves with long white hair-points.


Fleshy Liverwort Marchantia sp
Photo E Collins
Showing the flattened umbrella-like male reproductive bodies.It is surrounded by Fire Moss Funaria hygrometrica


Lichen unknown species
Photo N Blair
Thought to be a Parmelina species


Cladia sp. – sterile stems
Cladia sp. – sterile stems


Peltigera sp Dog Lichen
Photo N Blair
Shows side view of the lichen. The upper surface is darkish grey-green. The curled up white part is the underside.


Stereocaulon sp. – Foam or Snow Lichen


Parmotrema sp. – Ruffle Lichen
Photo N Blair


Breutelia affinis
Photo N Blair
The reddish splash cups at the tip os some stems show that this is a male plant.These contain the sperm. The nodding elongated globular capsules are female.


Heterodea muelleri Common Ground-frill Lichen
Photo N Blair
As the name implies this species with its frilly lobes, grows on the ground.
The dense brown fur below is a good diagnostic feature.


Grimmia pulvinata Grey Cushion Moss Moss
Photo G Ambrose.
A common olive green compact moss found on rocks and paths.The long white hair-tips are an obvious feature. Also called Ostrich Moss.


Cladia retipora Coral Lichen
Photo N Blair
The small black tips on the stems are the fruiting bodies of the fungal partner.Note the hollow, perforated stems which are characteristic of Cladia sp.The green tinge is the algal layer.


Unknown Lichen on dead wood.
Photo E Collins


Cladia sullivanii Pastel Shrub-lichen
Photo N Blair
This species is identified as Pastel Shrub-lichen because the fertile stmes are slender and there are few perforations on the stems, unlike C retipora.


Parmotrema sp. – Ruffle Lichen
Photo N Blair
Showing the speckled underside of the “ruffle”


Dawsonia longiseta Small Dawsonia
Photo Neil Blair
A close-up of the male splash-cup which contains the male sex organs. Raindrops can splash the sperm out as far as 10cms. The red cup attracts insects which feed on the secretions and spread the sperm.


Cladia aggegata Glossy Shrub-lichen
Photo N Blair
A good recognition feature is that the dark fruiting bodies are on broad stems, whereas the sterile stems are narrow and pointed.


Broad-leafed Marchantia M berteroana
Photo E Collins
The cup-like structures are gemma cups which hold small buds. These buds are washed out by raindrops.The tiny dots are openings to air chambers in the thallus.


Breutelia affinis Common Breutelia
Photo E Collins
A striking, cascading light green moss.The reddish coloured stem is hairy.


Cladonia sp
Photo N Blair


Cladia retipora. Coral Lichen
Photo N Blair
Fertile specimens. The fruiting bodies are immature and are the small dark areas at the branch tips.


Cladia sp. – sterile stems
Photo N Blair


Chiloscyphus semiteres Scented Crestwort
Photo N Blair
Leafy Liverworts have leaves without nerves.
This specimen shows the interesting leaf edges.


Tortula muralis Wall Screw-moss
Photo G Ambrose
An attractive small moss found in rock crevices, on some trees.


Parmotrema sp. – Ruffle Lichen
Photo N Blair
Showing the apothecia, the sexual fruiting body that produces spores


Encrusting fungus
Photo N Blair
A lichen look-a-like


Trumpet Lichen Cladonia sp
Photo E Collins
Also called Pixie Cups this lichen is found on soil, stumps and logs.The fruiting structures rise from the scales on the ground. The green branched lichen in the background is Cladia aggregata


Peltigera sp Dog Lichen
Photo Neil Blair
Features curved saddle-shaped structures.


Dawsonia longiseta Small Dawsonia
Photo Neil Blair
A group of flower-like male plants.


Cladonia subulata Antlered Powderhorn
Photo N Blair
Lichen surrounded by various mosses.


Cladia retipora Coral Lichen
Photo E Collins
A valuable lichen that protects bare the soil. Is very crisp when dry but becomes sponge-like after rain as it absorbs moisture through its many perforations. Enlarge to see these.Distinguish from other Cladia sp by its whitish colour and numerous large pores which almost touch each other.


Stereocaulon sp. – Foam or Snow Lichen
Photo N Blair


Gold Dust Lichen Chrysothrix candelaris
Photo E Collins
This is a powdery lemon-yellow lichen of shaded bark and wood.
ID and notes for these photos was kindly provided by Dr Graeme Ambrose.


Trumpet Lichen in Common Twine-moss
Photo E Collins.
The perennial Common Twine-moss is Triquetrella papillata.


Flavoparmelia caperata Common Greenshield Lichen
Photo N Blair


Greenshield Lichen Flavoparmelia sp
Photo E Collins
A common foliose lichen on wood.The discs are fruiting bodies which produce the spores of the fungal partner.


Dawsonia longiseta Small Dawsonia
Photo Neil Blair
Here we see the ribbed brown capsule with its tuft of long white hairs.
These regulate the spore shedding.The ribbing and the hair tufts are good ID features.


Cladia sp. – sterile stems
Photo N Blair


Usnea Beard Lichen
Photo N Blair
Also called Old Man’s Beard Lichen by virtue of its hairy appearance. This is a fertile species as it has spore producing cups. If the photo is enlarged,the cups, called apothecia, can be seen as white discs.


Stereocaulon sp. – Foam or Snow Lichen
Photo N Blair


Usnea sp Beard Lichen
Photo P Spencer.
Possibly fertile and yet to mature.


Peltigera sp Dog Lichen
Photo N Blair


A sunburst lichen Xanthoria parietina
Photo R Sharp
A colourful lichen that favours nutrient rich surfaces such as the bark of ash and walnut trees.


Grimmia laevigata Salt and Pepper
Photo N Blair
A pioneer moss that grows on bare rock and can dry up for 10 years or more. It revives quickly when wetted and the individual leafy stems can be easily seen.


Flavoparmelia Greenshield Lichen
Photo N Blair


Encrusting fungus
Photo N Blair.
Close up photo.


Brunonia australis Blue pincushion
Photo E Collins
Colours vary from blues to mauves


Melichrus urceolatus Urn Heath
Photo E Collins
Winter flowering


Glossodia major Waxlip Orchid
Photo E Collins
The white, waxy labellum gives this orchid its common name. One of the earliest spring orchids.


Kennedia rubicunda Running Postman
Photo E Collins
Confined to the Mt Pilot section of the park where it is uncommon.


Dillwynia phyllicoides Cream and pink form
Photo E Collins
An unusual and attractive form of this pea.


Daviesia genistifolia Broom Bitter-pea
Photo E Collins
Low-growing spiny plant flowering in late winter.
Regionally rare common in the park


Profusion of peas Ironbark track
Photo E Collins
The pea species of Chiltern are spectacular in spring.


Acacia gunnii
Photo M Webster
A low growing wattle, reasonably common in the park. Often over looked unless in flower. Self protected from herbivore grazing by its sharp leaves. July- September


Isotome axillaris Rock Isotome
Photo E Collins
The delightful plant grows among the granite rocks on Mt Pilot.


Isoetes pusilla Small Quillwort
Photo N Blair
This small grass-like aquatic grows in the rock pools on granite outcrops and is restricted to Chiltern and Beechworth.
Rare.


Acacia pycnantha with Hardenbergia violaceae
Photo E Collins


Acacia genistifolia Spreading Wattle
Photo E Collins
A winter flowering wattle


Drosera glanduligera Scarlet Sundew
Photo E Collins
Found in open stony areas
An exquisite little plant.


Acacia gunnii Ploughshare Wattle
Photo E Collins
Leaf resembles a ploughshare.


Leucopogon virgatus Common Beard-heath
Photo E Collins
A magnifying glass will help reveal the beauty of this flower.


Amyema miquelli Box Mistletoe
Photo E Collins
Common mistletoe in the ironbark section of the park.


Cymbonotus preissianus Austral Bear’s Ears
Photo E Collins
Often mistaken for Capeweed


Leucochrysum albicans Hoary Sunray
Photo E Collins
Foliage grey


*Orobanche minor Lesser Broomrape group
Photo J McDonald
Native to Europe. Parasitic on a wide range of plants.


Lomandra multiflora Many-flowered Mat-rush
Photo E Collins


Acacia verniciflua Varnish Wattle
Photo E Collins


Leucochrysum albicans Hoary Sunray
Photo E Collins


Podolepis jaceoides Showy Podolepis
Photo E Collins


Lotus australis Austral trefoil
Photo by Eileen Collins
Uncommon plant in Chiltern.


Dianella longifolia fruits Pale Flax-lily
Photo E Collins


Gompholobium huegelii Common Wedge-pea
Photo E Collins
Also called Karalla


Acacia pycnantha Golden Wattle
Photo J Birckhead
Flowering in late June and providing early colour to the bush


Lobelia gibbosa Tall Lobelia
Photo E Collins


Hardenbergia violaceae Purple Coral-pea
Photo E Collins


Wurmbea dioica Early Nancy female flower
Photo E Collins


Burchardia umbellata Milkmaids
Photo E Collins
Tiny Sedge Moths taking nectar


Acacia genistifolia Spreading Wattle
Photo E Collins
A showy winter flowering wattle.


Hardenbergia violaceae Purple Coral-pea
Photo E Collins
Also called Happy Wanderer


Platylobium formosum Handsome Flat-pea
Photo E Collins


Duck Orchids en masse Brian Oct 2020


Leucopogon virgatus Beard-heath
Photo E Collins
A delicate flower the beauty of which can be appreciated through a magnifying glass. Oct-Nov


Wahlenbergia sp Bluebell
Photo E Collins


Amyema miraculosa ssp boormanii Fleshy Mistletoe
Photo E Collins
This beautiful mistletoe is parasitic on Box Mistletoe, A miquelli.


*Orobanche minor Lesser Broomrape
Photo N Blair
Flower bud.


Platylobium formosum Handsome Flat-pea
Photo E Collins


Pultenaea laxiflora Loose-flower Bush-pea
Photo E Collins


Acacia verniciflua Varnish Wattle
Photo N Bartlett
The shiny “varnished” leaves give this plant its common name


Hovea linearis Common Hovea
Photo E Collins
Flowering in mid to late winter


Brunonia australis Blue pincushion
Photo E Collins
Colours vary from blues to mauves


Melichrus urceolatus Urn Heath
Photo E Collins
Winter flowering


Triptilodiscus pygmaeus Pygmy Sunray
Photo E Collins
Small groundcover plant


Triglochin procerum Water- ribbons
Photo E Collins
Uncommon


Dsyphania glomulifera Pigweed
Photo E Collins.


Dillwyinia phylicoides Small-leaf Parrot-pea
Photo E Collins


Xerochrysum viscosum Golden Everlasting.
Photo E Collins
Bartley’s Block in late spring


Xanthorrhoea glauca ssp angustifolia Grey GrassTree
Photo E Collins
Formerly X australis but now described as a new sp.
Restricted to Chiltern and the Warby Ranges


Vellieia paradoxa Spur Velleia
Photo E Collins


Pimelia linifolia Slender Rice-flower
Photo E Collins


Leucopogon virgatus Common Beard-heath
Photo E Collins


Goodenia hederacea Ivy Goodenia
Photo E Collins


Hibbertia riparia Erect Guinea-flower
Photo E Collins


Hardenbergia violaceae Purple Coral-pea
Photo E Collins
White-flowered plants occur occasionally.


Swainsona procumbens Broughton Pea
Photo E Collins
Plant of seasonally wet areas mostly N of the park.


Cheiranthera cyanea Blue Finger-flower
Photo E Collins
The five yellow stamens give this flower its common name, Finger-flower


Carex appressa Tall Sedge
Photo E Collins
Common in the wetter gullies. Leaves are razor sharp.


Brunonia australis group Blue Pincushions
Photo E Collins
Best in late spring


Daviesia leptophylla Narrow-leaf Bitter-pea
Photo E Collins


Lomandra multiflora Many-flowered Mat-rush
Photo E Collins
Common and quite striking when in flower.


Ajuga australis Austral Bugle
Photo E Collins
Attractive perennial herb which brightens the forest floor in October.


Indigofera australis Austral Indigo
Photo E Collins


Dipsacus fullonum * Wild Teazel
Photo N Blair
A rather attractive introduced plant. Is listed as an environmental weed in Victoria.
Can grow to two metres tall and has a large basal rosette which shades out other ground dwelling plants.


*Orobanche minor Lesser Broomrape
Photo N Blair
A parasitic and leafless plant. Often mistaken for an orchid. Weed.


Utricularia dichotoma Fairies’ Aprons
Photo E Collins
Delicate plant of the soak areas. Sometimes flower are white.Also called Purple Bladderwort.


Cheiranthera cyanea Finger-flower
Photo E Collins
The five yellow stamens are held like five fingers. hence the common name.


Poranthera microphylla Small Poranthera
Photo E Collins


Lotus australis Austral trefoil
Photo E Collins
Uncommon


Brachyscome gracilis Dookie Daisy
Photo E Collins
This small daisy is a vulnerable species. Sept-Oct.


Arthopodium strictum Chocolate-lily
Photo E Collins
At their best in mid-spring and especially good in sites where the understorey has been reduced after a fuel reduction burn.


Cymbonotus preissianus Austral Bear’s’-ears
Photo E Collins.
The underside of the leaves are pale and furry to touch.


Cheilanthes austrotenuifolia Green Rock Fern
Photo E Collins


Brachyscome basaltica var gracilis
Photo N Blair
This photo shows the leaves.


Bulbine bulbosa Bulbine Lily
Photo E Collins


Convolvulus erubescens Pink Bindweed
Photo E Collins


Levenhookia dubia Hairy Stylewort
Photo E Collins


Thysanotus tuberosus Common Fringe-lily
Photo E Collins
Autumn flowering


Pleurosorus rutifilous
Photo N Blair


Hyrdocotyle laxiflora Stinking Pennywort
Photo E Collins
The aroma of this ground ground cover pervades the bush in early summer.


After40mm rainMay 07 Valley1Dam
Photo E Collins.
After the 2006/7 drought Valley No 1 Dam dried out. following the first rains small plants appeared in the cracks.


Acacia lanigera Woolly Wattle
Photo E Collins August 2005
Uncommon. Photographed on Mt Pilot post the 2003 fires.An attractive compact shrub with hairy branchlets. Other name : Hairy wattle


Daviesia genistifolia Broom Bitter-pea
Photo E Collins
Daviesia sp have triangular shaped pods. This plant is very attractive when pods are fresh


Brunonia australis Blue Pincushion
Photo E Collins
Colour varies with age and soil


Dillwynia phylicoides Small-leaf Parrot-pea
Photo E Collins


Brachyscome basaltica var gracilis
Photo N Blair.


Brachyscome gracilis Dookie Daisy
Photo E Collins
Found in dry rocky habitat. This is a vulnerable species.


Dysphania glomulifera Pigweed
Photo E Collins


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Photo E Collins


Velleia pardoxa Spur Velleia
Photo E Collins


Gompholobium huegelii Wedge-pea
Photo E Collins
Also called Karalla


Micromyrtus ciliatus Fringed Heath-myrtle
Photo N Bartlett
The spring display on the summit of Mt Pilot is specatacular


Persoonia rigida Hairy Geebung
Photo E Collins
When not in flower is often mistaken for Grevillea alpina


cracks_filling_may07
Photo E Collins
Water plants in filling cracks post 2006/7 drought


Stylidium graminifolium Grass Trigger-plant
Photo E Collins


Brunonia australis Blue pincushion


Melichrus urceolatus Urn Heath
Photo E Collins
Winter flowering


Photo E Collins Winter flowering
Photo by Scott Jessup


Photo by Scott Jessup